Catégories
blog

#07 Reactions to COVID-19 from international cooperation in education: Between continuities and unexpected changes

This article is based on the data available prior to publication. As the topic is highly evolving, we may need to update the article at a later date.

Since March 2020, when the COVID-19 pandemic spread beyond China’s borders, many international cooperation institutions have mobilized to respond to this crisis. The closure of schools in more than 150 countries and the shift to distance learning in most countries where the epidemic is rampant was the trigger.

In this article, we will analyze the actions and orientations proposed by major organizations in the field. (Some blogs [ex. 1 or ex. 2] were only at the level of description.)

Many of the observations made in previous articles in this blog are still valid. However, a few changes, and we will see if they are pleasing, have appeared regarding this crisis.

Priority to the most fragile contexts

This crisis has highlighted the importance of acting even more in the most fragile contexts, where education systems were already experiencing difficulty before the crisis. From this point of view, there seems to be a consensus on the part of the international organizations studied, which are concerned about the difficulties of ensuring pedagogical continuity when everyone does not have the same access to quality teaching and educational resources outside school.

UN agencies, for instance, have emphasized the challenges for certain contexts or populations regarding access to these resources.

The UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, recalled that “almost all students are now out of school. Some schools are offering distance learning, but this is not available to all. Children in countries with slow and expensive Internet services are severely disadvantaged.” Furthermore, UNESCO, the UN specialized agency in the field of education, relays the message of the parent agency.

Turning teaching materials into digital format at short notice has been a challenge as few teachers have strong digital and ICT skills. In many countries in South West Asia and sub-Saharan Africa only about 20% or often fewer households have internet connectivity at home, let alone personal computers.

Source : UNESCO

UNESCO has even launched a Global Education Coalition that brings together multilateral, private sector, and philanthropic partners to support distance education globally. Among the goals of this coalition is the need “to help countries assure the inclusive and equitable provision of distance education.”

This priority of reaching the most disadvantaged is also visible through the funds granted by cooperation institutions, which fear that this additional crisis will jeopardize their efforts. For this reason, existing or new resources will be mobilized to respond to it.

This is the case of the World Bank through funds previously allocated to countries that can be redirected in response to the education situation created by the health crisis. Among other things, the organization is funding impact evaluations to understand what the most effective solutions to promote learning for children and adults in low- and middle-income countries are and, thus, generate useful and rapidly mobilizable information. The World Bank has so far made $160 billion available to 25 countries in its first set of emergency support operations. Of the countries eligible to receive these funds, only Pakistan has indicated its intention to use them for education. This is not surprising. This corresponds to an observed trend in aid to education, as we noted in blog #01—namely, between 2000 and 2010, more than half of the funds allocated to education by the World Bank went to three countries (India, Pakistan and Bangladesh) that are not among the poorest countries. It is, therefore, necessary to be vigilant in the granting of this aid, particularly for the populations most in need.

Other institutions, such as the Global Partnership for Education (GPE), and funds, such as Education Cannot Wait (ECW), are also mobilized in favor of vulnerable contexts where they usually act.

GPE has released $250 million to help developing countries mitigate the immediate and long-term effects of the pandemic on education: “The funds will help sustain learning for up to 355 million children, with a focus on ensuring that girls and poor children, who will be hit the hardest by school closures, can continue their education.”

ECW has activated a “First Emergency Response” funding stream to redirect existing funds as well as raise additional funds to support education. It has raised $23 million and is requesting an additional $50 million to address COVID-related education needs. Priorities include ensuring the continuity of distance learning and COVID awareness. Most of the funds are allocated to implementing partners, including UNICEF and the World Food Programme.

Even if massive commitments are observed, the arguments by international organizations to justify interventions in disadvantaged contexts have remained relatively the same. Moreover, some organizations have taken advantage of this exceptional situation to further legitimize their actions. Beyond the fact that institutions and funds such as ECW or Save the Children can boast of having already been active for several years in crisis contexts, it is interesting to note that for the World Bank, for example, the priority remains “preserving human capital,” a key concept for the organization. Similarly, if we analyze the expertise the Bank brings to the countries through documents that can be used by staff on the ground to guide national policies, we find the organization’s classic rhetoric: pedagogical continuity must be ensured insofar as school closures will have an impact on access to employment and, therefore, on economic growth—which is the organization’s leitmotif, given that several economies are informal in the countries of intervention of the organization. Also, prior to COVID-19, the World Bank was concerned about learning poverty (“the percentage of children unable to read and understand a simple text by age 10”) in developing countries. This recent concept developed by the World Bank is being exploited to its full potential as the pandemic adds another barrier to learning.

Finally, with regard to taking into account populations constrained by adversity, it should be noted that this crisis has particularly highlighted the crucial role played by teachers in ensuring pedagogical continuity. Teaching is a profession affected by precariousness in several contexts. For instance, UNESCO clearly assumes this role with the slogan “Protect, support and recognize teachers.” Another example is that the GPE allows its special funds to be used to protect teachers who are suffering the negative effects of this crisis.

Teachers may have been on other duties or forced to leave their jobs. Crisis and postcrisis education budgets will be under pressure but for rapid and effective recovery national systems must keep their teachers. It is essential to support them through the crisis, enable them to support continuity of learning and prepare them for recovery and reopening as well as addressing recruitment gaps if these emerge.

Source : Global Partnership for Education

Some novelties, sometimes surprising

Despite having relatively similar agendas before and during the COVID-19 crisis, we can point to some new developments—some encouraging but some worrisome.

This crisis has highlighted the importance of education (in particular, schooling) and, therefore, the need to protect it everywhere in the world, both in the Global North and in the Global South. Moreover, the World Bank, whose areas of intervention are usually located in “developing” countries, is interested in the contexts of the “developed” countries, as it was when it was created in 1945. We even find the idea of a “gigantic educational crisis,” which goes beyond the “learning crisis” that we have known until now, insofar as the influential states within the World Bank are themselves affected. Another interesting fact from this point of view is that even organizations working in normal times in crisis contexts (conflicts, natural disasters, etc.) find themselves supporting all education systems, being accustomed to acting in emergencies. This is the case with the Inter-Agency Network for Education in Emergencies, which brings together a range of cooperation actors and offers technical support to governments, with UNICEF and Save the Children making a substantial contribution during the COVID-19 period. In any case, perhaps this crisis will make it possible to advance the sense of global citizenship and solidarity that had already taken shape with youth movements on climate challenges, even though we have witnessed the closure of borders for health reasons.

Another novelty in the discourse of cooperation—this time, less favorable if we believe in the principle of everyone’s right to quality education everywhere in the world—is the excessive promotion of private sector actors, especially by UNESCO, which is often seen as having a humanist vision. Indeed, the organization wants to find equitable solutions in this period of crisis, as mentioned above, and, at the same time, bring to the forefront, through its Global Education Coalition, private for-profit institutions, particularly from the field of new technologies. Several reasons, not exhaustive, should alert us to the growing involvement of these companies in the education sector:

• Their products may be available at high costs.
• They did not necessarily demonstrate a willingness to contextualize their products (through languages of instruction, contents etc.) before the COVID-19 crisis.
• They may contribute to a deterioration of the public system by placing their revenues in tax havens.
• The data they collect from consumers can be used for commercial purposes.

Partly aware of this concern, which was echoed by civil society, UNESCO removed certain institutions whose ethics were clearly incompatible with the organization’s declared values, such as Bridge International Academies, from the initial list of institutions. Another alarming implicit message: beyond the Global Education Coalition, UNESCO, in response to the crisis, is proposing a list of available tools that promotes here again private companies.

But where we see all the complexities of the discourse of international organizations, as we showed earlier in an article in this blog, other voices are being heard within UNESCO including the International Commission on the Futures of Education—a recent initiative of the organization that made the following statement, giving a little more hope).

Une image contenant capture d’écran</p>

<p>Description générée automatiquement

In the same spirit, UNESCO, through the Global Education Monitoring Report team, publishes texts that warn against the possible excesses of the COVID-19 crisis—such as the blog article by Francine Menashy, which highlights the commercial interests of private actors for education (particularly in crisis contexts).

Since we are on the discourse contradictions, or at least on fuzzy positions amplified by the global crisis, we are also observing a shift at the level of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), which provides support in terms of expertise by disclosing good practices. In particular, the institution has coproduced a report with HundrEd, a nonprofit organization that seeks and shares inspiring innovations for primary and secondary education “for free.” The report contains some unusual rhetoric by the OECD: for once, economics (which is the organization’s Trojan horse, as its name suggests) is not at the heart of the discourse.

But in the meantime, the OECD, making explicit its concern to note the effects of the crisis on, in particular, the “diminished economic supply and demand, severely impacting businesses and jobs,” has produced A Framework to Guide an Education Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic of 2020 written by Fernando Reimers, a professor at Harvard and a member of UNESCO’s Futures of Education Commission, and Andreas Schleicher, head of the education sector at the OECD. Using the responses to an online questionnaire and PISA data for its analysis, this report highlights the challenges faced by different education systems in dealing with the reliance on e-learning as an alternative modality. The guidelines are general: the report is concerned, in particular, with the development of public–private partnerships or consideration of the most vulnerable populations but without specifying the exact modalities. This leaves the door open to any kind of strategy, as the authors did not particularly position themselves on principles related to the right to education.

Finally, still on surprising developments, the World Bank Group’s International Finance Corporation has pledged to freeze investments in private for-profit preprimary, primary, and secondary (also called “K-12”) schools. Although the request was made by several civil society organizations for months, the COVID-19 crisis accelerated this decision. The decision is in response to concerns about the effects of segregation and exclusion, the insufficient quality of education, noncompliance with standards and regulations, working conditions, and profit seeking commercial schools. Such actions, accompanied by statements such as “we expect a lot from our education systems, but tend to underestimate the complexity of the task and do not always provide the resources that the sector would need to meet our expectations” suggest an almost 180° turnaround by the World Bank, if we bear in mind the structural adjustment programs and their devastating effects on education systems in fragile countries.

IN CONCLUSION, WE CAN OBSERVE THAT INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN EDUCATION IS TAKING SERIOUSLY THE CHALLENGES THE COVID-19 CRISIS IS CREATING FOR EDUCATION SYSTEMS WORLDWIDE, ESPECIALLY IN DISADVANTAGED CONTEXTS. ALTHOUGH SEVERAL ACTIONS ARE IN LINE WITH WHAT INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS WERE DOING BEFORE, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT SOME NEW DEVELOPMENTS, ENCOURAGING OR WORRYING, HAVE APPEARED RECENTLY—WHICH ONLY INCREASES THE FEELING OF CONTRADICTIONS, EVEN THOUGH IT WOULD BE MORE USEFUL THAN EVER TO HAVE A CLEAR DISCOURSE TO PROVIDE A GLIMPSE OF A MORE RADIANT FUTURE. FROM THIS POINT OF VIEW, WE AGREE WITH ELIN MARTINEZ OF HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH, WHO IN HER ARTICLE WROTE THAT “ALL GOVERNMENTS SHOULD LEARN FROM THIS EXPERIENCE, AND STRENGTHEN THEIR EDUCATION SYSTEMS TO WITHSTAND FUTURE CRISES, WHETHER FROM DISEASE, ARMED CONFLICT, OR CLIMATE CHANGE.” SOLUTIONS SUCH AS HAVING A FAIRER TAXATION SYSTEM HAVE ALREADY BEEN HIGHLIGHTED BY ORGANIZATIONS SUCH AS ACTIONAID. FURTHERMORE, RESEARCH MUST BE ABLE TO ANALYZE, IN DEPTH, THE CURRENT AND FUTURE ACTIONS OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN THE CONTEXT OF THIS CRISIS AND, IN PARTICULAR, WHAT IS HAPPENING ON THE FIELD BEYOND THE DECLARATIONS.

Catégories
blog

#07 Les réactions à COVID-19 de la coopération internationale en éducation : entre continuités et retournements inédits

Cet article se base sur des données disponibles avant sa publication. La thématique évoquée étant très évolutive, nous pourrons être amené à mettre à jour l’article ultérieurement.

Depuis le mois de mars 2020, période à laquelle la pandémie du COVID-19 a dépassé les frontières de la Chine et s’est répandue dans d’autres contextes nationaux, de nombreuses institutions de coopération internationale se sont mobilisées pour répondre à cette crise. La fermeture d’écoles dans plus de 150 pays, et le passage à l’enseignement et à l’apprentissage à distance, dans la plupart des pays où sévissait l’épidémie en a été l’élément déclencheur.

Dans cet article, nous allons analyser les actions et orientations proposées par des organisations majeures dans le domaine (certains blogs (ex.1 ou ex.2) se sont contentés de simplement décrire les récentes déclarations).

Beaucoup de constats établis dans des articles précédents de ce blog sont toujours valables. Quelques nouveautés, et nous verrons si elles sont réjouissantes, sont apparues avec cette crise.

Priorité aux contextes les plus fragilisés

Cette crise aura mis en évidence l’importance d’agir encore davantage dans les contextes les plus fragilisés, là où les systèmes éducatifs étaient déjà en difficulté avant la crise. De ce point de vue, il semble qu’il y ait un consensus de la part des organisations internationales étudiées, qui s’inquiètent des difficultés d’assurer la continuité pédagogique quand toutes et tous n’ont pas le même accès hors de l’école à un enseignement et à des ressources éducatives, qui plus est, de qualité. 

Les institutions onusiennes insistent par exemple sur les défis pour certains contextes ou certaines populations d’accéder à ces ressources.

Le Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies, António Guterres, rappelle que « presque plus aucun élève ne va à l’école. Certains établissements proposent un enseignement à distance, mais cette solution est loin d’être la norme. Les enfants des pays où les services Internet sont lents et coûteux sont gravement désavantagés ». L’UNESCO, institution des Nations Unies spécialisée dans le domaine de l’éducation, relaie le message de l’institution mère.

La conversion des supports pédagogiques au format numérique dans des délais très brefs a posé problème, car peu d’enseignant·e·s possèdent de solides compétences numériques et en TIC. Dans de nombreux pays d’Asie du Sud-Ouest et d’Afrique subsaharienne, seulement 20 % environ des foyers, et souvent moins, disposent d’une connexion Internet à la maison, sans parler d’un ordinateur

Source : UNESCO

L’UNESCO va même être à la tête d’une Coalition Mondiale pour l’Éducation qui rassemble des organisations multilatérales, du secteur privé et philanthropiques pour soutenir l’enseignement à distance au niveau mondial. Parmi les objectifs de cette coalition, il y a la nécessité de chercher des solutions équitables et un accès universel aux ressources pour les populations davantage exclues durant la pandémie.

Cette priorité d’atteindre les plus défavorisé·e··s est également visible par le biais des fonds octroyés par les institutions de coopération qui redoutent que leurs efforts soient mis en péril avec cette crise supplémentaire. Raison pour laquelle des moyens existants ou nouveaux vont être mobilisés pour y répondre.

C’est le cas de la Banque mondiale à travers des fonds déjà alloués auparavant aux pays qui peuvent être redirigés en réponse à la situation éducative créée par la crise sanitaire. L’organisation finance notamment des évaluations d’impact afin de saisir quelles sont les solutions les plus efficaces pour favoriser les apprentissages des enfants et des adultes dans les pays à faible ou moyen revenu, et ainsi de générer des informations utiles et rapidement mobilisables. Elle a jusqu’ici mis 160 milliards de dollars à la disposition de 25 pays dans le cadre d’une première série d’opérations de soutien d’urgence. Parmi les pays qui peuvent recevoir ces fonds, seul le Pakistan a fait part de son intention de les utiliser pour l’éducation. Cela n’est pas étonnant, et correspond à une tendance observée de l’aide à l’éducation comme nous l’avions relevé dans le blog #01, à savoir qu’entre 2000 et 2010, plus de la moitié des fonds alloués à l’éducation par la Banque mondiale étaient destinés à trois pays, l’Inde, le Pakistan et le Bangladesh, qui ne se situent pas parmi les pays les plus pauvres. Il faudra donc être vigilant sur l’octroi de cette aide, en particulier pour les populations les plus dans le besoin.

D’autres institutions comme le Partenariat Mondial pour l’Éducation (PME) ou des Fonds comme Education Cannot Wait vont également se mobiliser largement en faveur de contextes vulnérables où ils agissent habituellement.

Le PME a débloqué 250 millions de dollars pour aider les pays en développement à atténuer les effets immédiats et à long terme de la pandémie sur l’éducation : « Ces fonds aideront à soutenir l’apprentissage de jusqu’à 355 millions d’enfants, en veillant à ce que les filles et les enfants issus des familles pauvres, qui seront les plus durement frappés par les fermetures d’écoles, puissent continuer à apprendre ».

Education Cannot Wait a activé un volet de financement de « Première intervention d’urgence » pour réorienter les fonds actuels ainsi que pour collecter des fonds supplémentaires afin de soutenir l’éducation. Elle a collecté 23 millions de dollars et demande 50 millions de dollars supplémentaires pour répondre aux besoins d’éducation liés à COVID. Les priorités consistent à notamment assurer la continuité de l’apprentissage à distance ou la sensibilisation au COVID. La plupart des fonds sont alloués à des partenaires de mise en œuvre, notamment l’UNICEF et le Programme alimentaire mondial.

Même si des engagements massifs sont observés, les arguments mobilisés par les organisations internationales pour justifier des interventions dans les contextes défavorisés n’ont en revanche pas tellement évolué. D’ailleurs, certaines organisations profitent de cette situation exceptionnelle pour légitimer davantage leurs actions. Au-delà du fait que des agences comme Education Cannot Wait ou Save the Children peuvent se targuer de déjà agir depuis de nombreuses années dans des contextes de crise, il est intéressant de noter que pour la Banque mondiale par exemple, la priorité reste de « préserver le capital humain « , concept clé pour l’organisation. De même, si nous analysons l’expertise que la Banque apporte auprès des pays à travers notamment des guides qui peuvent servir au staff sur le terrain pour orienter les politiques nationales, nous retrouvons la rhétorique classique de l’organisation, à savoir qu’il faut assurer la continuité pédagogique dans la mesure où les fermetures d’écoles auront un impact sur l’accès à l’emploi et donc sur la croissance économique, grand leitmotiv de l’institution, sachant que beaucoup d’économies sont informelles dans les pays d’intervention de l’organisation. Aussi, avant COVID-19, la Banque mondiale se préoccupait de la pauvreté d’apprentissage dans les pays en développement (« le pourcentage d’enfants qui ne savent pas lire et comprendre un texte simple à l’âge de 10 ans »). Ce récent concept apporté par la Banque mondiale est exploité à son maximum puisque la pandémie ajoute une barrière supplémentaire à l’apprentissage. 

Pour finir sur la prise en compte des populations contraintes par l’adversité, notons que cette crise a mis particulièrement en lumière le rôle crucial joué par les enseignant·e·s pour assurer la continuité pédagogique, profession touchée dans de nombreux contextes par la précarité.  Par exemple, l’UNESCO l’assume clairement avec ce slogan « Protéger, soutenir et reconnaître les enseignants« . Autre exemple, le PME autorise que ses fonds spéciaux soit utilisés pour protéger les enseignant·e·s qui subissent les effets négatifs de cette crise.

Des enseignant·e·s risquent d’avoir été réaffecté·e·s ou forcé·e·s de quitter leur emploi. Les budgets d’éducation durant la crise et après la crise seront sous pression, mais les systèmes nationaux doivent retenir leurs enseignant·e·s pour pouvoir se rétablir rapidement et efficacement. Il est essentiel de leur prêter assistance pendant la crise, ce qui leur permettra d’assurer la continuité de l’enseignement, de se préparer au rétablissement et à la réouverture, et de faire face aux problèmes de recrutement le cas échéant.

Source : Partenariat Mondial pour l’Éducation

Des nouveautés, parfois surprenantes

Malgré des agendas relativement similaires à avant la crise du COVID-19, nous pouvons relever quelques nouveautés, certaines encourageantes, d’autres préoccupantes.

Cette crise aura mis en exergue l’importance que représente le domaine de l’éducation, et en particulier de la scolarisation, et donc de la nécessité de le protéger, partout dans le monde, aussi bien au Nord qu’au Sud. D’ailleurs, la Banque mondiale dont les zones d’intervention se situent habituellement dans les pays en développement s’intéresse aux contextes des pays du Nord, comme au moment de sa création en 1945. Nous retrouvons même l’idée de « crise éducative gigantesque », qui va au-delà de la « crise d’apprentissage » que nous connaissions jusqu’à maintenant, dans la mesure où les États influents au sein de la Banque mondiale étant eux-mêmes touchés. Autre fait intéressant de ce point de vue : même des organisations qui travaillent en temps normal dans des contextes de crise (conflits, catastrophes naturelles etc.) se retrouvent à appuyer l’ensemble des systèmes éducatifs, étant habitués à agir dans l’urgence. C’est le cas avec le cas du Réseau Inter-agences pour l’Éducation en Situation d’Urgence (INEE) qui regroupe un ensemble d’institutions de la coopération et propose un appui technique aux gouvernements, l’UNICEF et Save the Children y apportant une contribution substantielle pendant la période du COVID-19. Quoiqu’il en soit, peut-être que cette crise permettra, même si nous avons assisté à la fermeture des frontières pour des raisons sanitaires, de faire progresser le sentiment de citoyenneté mondiale et de solidarité, qui avait déjà pris forme avec les mouvements de la jeunesse sur les défis climatiques.

Autre nouveauté dans le discours de la coopération, cette fois moins favorable si nous croyons au principe du droit de toutes et tous à une éducation de qualité, partout dans le monde, c’est la promotion excessive d’institutions du secteur privé, surtout quand cela vient de la part de l’UNESCO, souvent considérée comme ayant une vision humaniste. En effet, l’organisation veut en même temps trouver des solutions équitables dans cette période de crise, comme nous l’avons mentionné plus haut, et en même temps mettre sur le devant de la scène, à travers sa Coalition Mondiale pour l’Éducation des institutions privées à but lucratif, en particulier provenant du domaine des nouvelles technologies. Plusieurs raisons, non exhaustives, doivent nous alerter à propos de l’implication croissante de ces entreprises dans le secteur éducatif :

  • Leurs produits peuvent être accessibles à des coûts élevés ;
  • Elles n’ont pas nécessairement démontré une volonté de contextualiser (langues d’instruction, contenus etc.) leurs produits avant la crise du COVID-19 ;
  • Elles peuvent contribuer à une détérioration du système public en plaçant leurs revenus dans des paradis fiscaux ;
  • Les données qu’elles récoltent auprès des consommateurs peuvent servir à des fins marchandes.

En partie consciente de cette inquiétude relayée par la société civile, l’UNESCO a retiré certaines institutions, telles que Bridge International Academies, de la liste initiale dont l’éthique était clairement incompatible avec les valeurs déclarées de l’organisation. Autre message implicite alarmant : au-delà de la Coalition Mondiale pour l’Éducation, l’UNESCO, pour répondre à la crise, propose une liste d’outils disponibles qui fait là encore la promotion d’entreprises privées.

Mais là où nous voyons toute la complexité du discours des organisations internationales, telles que nous l’avons montré antérieurement dans un article de ce blog, d’autres voix se font entendre au sein de l’UNESCO, et notamment la Commission internationale sur les Futurs de l’Éducation, récente initiative de l’organisation, qui a fait la déclaration suivante, donnant un peu plus d’espoir.

Dans le même état d’esprit, l’UNESCO, à travers l’équipe du Rapport mondial de suivi sur l’éducation, publie des textes qui mettent en garde contre les dérives possibles de la crise du COVID-19 comme l’article de Francine Menashy qui met en lumière les intérêts commerciaux des acteurs du privé pour l’éducation, en particulier dans des contextes de crise.

Puisque nous sommes sur les contradictions dans les discours, ou du moins sur des positionnements flous amplifiés avec la situation de crise mondiale, nous observons également un glissement au niveau de l’Organisation pour la Coopération et le Développement économique (OCDE), qui fournit un appui en termes d’expertise en divulguant des bonnes pratiques. L’institution a notamment co-produit un rapport avec HundrEd, une organisation à but non lucratif, qui recherche et partage « gratuitement » des innovations inspirantes pour l’éducation primaire et secondaire. On y retrouve une rhétorique peu usuelle pour l’institution : pour une fois, l’économie (qui est le cheval de Troie de l’organisation comme son nom l’indique) n’est pas au cœur du discours.

Mais dans le même moment, l’OCDE, explicitant cette fois son souci de constater l’impact de la crise, en particulier sur la « diminution de l’offre et de la demande économiques, qui affecte gravement les entreprises et les emplois », a produit un Guide rapide pour l’élaboration d’une stratégie éducative pendant la pandémie, écrit par Fernando Reimers, par ailleurs enseignant-chercheur à Harvard et membre de la Commission internationale des Futurs de l’Éducation de l’UNESCO, et Andreas Schleicher, responsable du secteur éducation à l’OCDE. Utilisant les réponses d’un questionnaire en ligne et les données PISA pour son analyse, ce rapport met en lumière les défis auxquels sont confrontés les différents systèmes d’éducation face à la dépendance à l’éducation en ligne comme modalité alternative. Les orientations de ce guide sont très générales : le rapport se soucie notamment du développement de partenariat public-privé ou la prise en considération des populations des plus vulnérables, mais sans en préciser les modalités exactes. Ce qui laisse la porte ouverte à tout type de stratégie puisque, par ailleurs, les auteurs ne se positionnent pas particulièrement sur des principes en lien avec le droit à l’éducation.

Enfin, toujours sur les nouveautés surprenantes, la Société financière internationale (SFI) du groupe de la Banque mondiale a déclaré un gel des investissements à destination de l’enseignement primaire et secondaire privé à but lucratif. Même si la demande a été formulée par de nombreuses organisations de la société civile depuis des mois, la crise du COVID-19 a accéléré cette prise de décision. Cela vient répondre aux préoccupations concernant les effets sur la ségrégation et l’exclusion, la qualité insuffisante de l’éducation, le non-respect des normes et des règlements, les conditions de travail, et la recherche de profit des écoles commerciales. Ce genre d’actions accompagné de déclarations telles que « nous attendons beaucoup de nos systèmes éducatifs, mais nous avons tendance à sous-estimer la complexité de la tâche et ne fournissons pas toujours les ressources dont le secteur aurait besoin pour répondre à nos attentes » nous laisse penser à un retournement quasi à 180° de la Banque mondiale, si nous avons en tête les Programmes d’ajustement structurel et ses effets dévastateurs sur les systèmes éducatifs de pays fragiles.

EN CONCLUSION, NOUS POUVONS OBSERVER QUE LA COOPÉRATION INTERNATIONALE EN ÉDUCATION PREND TRÈS AU SERIEUX LES DÉFIS QU’ENGENDRE LA CRISE DU COVID-19 SUR LES SYSTÈMES ÉDUCATIFS DU MONDE ENTIER, ET EN PARTICULIER DANS LES CONTEXTES DEFAVORISÉS. BEAUCOUP D’ACTIONS SONT DANS LA DROITE LIGNE DE CE QUE LES ORGANISATIONS INTERNATIONALES FAISAIENT AVANT. NOUS AVONS NÉANMOINS DEMONTRÉ QUE DES NOUVEAUTÉS, ENCOURAGEANTES OU INQUIÉTANTES, SONT APPARUES DERNIÈREMENT, CE QUI FAIT QU’ACCROITRE LE SENTIMENT DE CONTRADICTIONS, ALORS MÊME QU’IL SERAIT PLUS QUE JAMAIS UTILE D’AVOIR UN DISCOURS CLAIR POUR LAISSER ENTREVOIR UN FUTUR PLUS RAYONNANT. DE CE POINT DE VUE, NOUS REJOIGNONS ELIN MARTINEZ, DE HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH, QUI DANS SON ARTICLE ECRIT QUE « TOUS LES GOUVERNEMENTS DEVRAIENT TIRER PARTI DE CETTE EXPÉRIENCE ET RENFORCER LEURS SYSTÈMES ÉDUCATIFS POUR RÉSISTER AUX CRISES FUTURES, QUE CE SOIT EN RAISON DE MALADIES, DE CONFLITS ARMÉS OU DU CHANGEMENT CLIMATIQUE ». DES SOLUTIONS ALLANT DANS CE SENS, TELLES QU’UN SYSTÈME DE TAXATION PLUS JUSTE, ONT DEJA ÉTÉ MIS EN LUMIÈRE PAR DES ORGANISATIONS COMME ACTIONAID. PAR AILLEURS, LA RECHERCHE DOIT ÊTRE EN MESURE D’ANALYSER EN PROFONDEUR LES ACTIONS ACTUELLES ET A VENIR DE LA COOPERATION INTERNATIONALE DANS LE CONTEXTE DE CETTE CRISE, ET EN PARTICULIER, CE QUI SE PASSE SUR LE TERRAIN, AU-DELÀ DES DÉCLARATIONS.

Catégories
blog

#04 Global Education Monitoring Report 2019: What lessons for international cooperation?

On the occasion of the official launch of UNESCO’s 2019 Global Education Monitoring Report, this article aims to promote the first interview of 𝗲𝗱𝘂’𝗖’ 𝗼𝗼𝗽, conducted with a member of the team that produced it, Dr. Nicole Bella, statistician and senior policy analyst. The interview focuses on the contribution of international cooperation to progress in the education sector and on areas that should receive increased attention from cooperation.

In part 1, Nicole Bella reminds us of the role of the report. This includes monitoring progress related to SDG 4 on education. From this point of view, it makes it possible to inform international cooperation actors not only about progress but also about global challenges. Beyond this monitoring, the report focuses on a specific theme each year. In 2019, the issue of migration, displacement, and their links with education is being addressed in greater depth.

Despite undeniable progress at the global level, many challenges remain in the education sector, according to the report, including:

  • Access to education (at all levels);
  • Girls’ schooling;
  • School completion;
  • Literacy;
  • Quality of learning.

Quality of learning, an SDG 4 priority, increasingly mobilizes international cooperation (part 2).

In part 3, the interview highlights the contribution of international cooperation to global educational progress. The SDGs provide for enhanced action by cooperating in the fight against poverty, including providing support for education. While noting that States remain the main donors to the sector, international assistance remains necessary for low-income countries, even if it does not target them as a priority (for example, aid to basic education in these contexts decreased from 36% in 2002 to 22% in 2016). Among the major initiatives to mobilize international funds for education to reverse this trend, Bella discusses the Global Partnership for Education (GPE), Education Cannot Wait and the Commission for Education. As the report focuses on migration-related issues, it focuses on supporting international cooperation for refugees and more inclusive education systems.

Finally, in part 4, the interview turns to possible actions for international cooperation in education to address the specific challenge of migration (knowing that there is a greater concentration of migrant flows within low-income countries despite what the intense media coverage of this issue in the North suggests). Among the recommendations made in the report, Bella highlights:

  • Respect for the right to education;
  • Development of inclusive education systems;
  • Promotion of the diversity of the teaching staff;
  • Strengthening humanitarian aid for education.
Catégories
blog

#04 Rapport mondial de suivi sur l’éducation 2019 Quelles leçons pour la coopération internationale ?

À l’occasion du lancement officiel du Rapport mondial de suivi sur l’éducation 2019 de l’UNESCO, cet article vise à promouvoir le premier entretien d’𝗲𝗱𝘂𝗖𝗼𝗼𝗽, réalisé avec une membre de l’équipe qui l’a produit, Dr. Nicole Bella, statisticienne et analyste principale des politiques. L’entretien met en particulier l’accent sur la contribution de la coopération internationale aux progrès dans le secteur éducatif et sur les domaines qui devraient faire l’objet d’une attention accrue de la part de la coopération.

Dans la partie 1, Nicole Bella nous rappelle quel est le rôle du rapport. Il s’agit notamment de faire le suivi des progrès liés à l’Objectif pour le développement durable n° 4 portant sur l’éducation. De ce point de vue, il permet d’informer les acteurs de la coopération internationale sur les avancées, mais aussi sur les défis mondiaux. Au-delà de ce suivi, le rapport se focalise sur une thématique spécifique chaque année. En 2019, c’est la question des migrations, des déplacements, et de leurs liens avec l’éducation qui est approfondie.

Malgré des progrès indéniables au niveau mondial, de nombreux défis subsistent dans le secteur éducatif d’après le rapport, parmi eux :

  • L’accès à l’éducation (à tous les niveaux) ;
  • La scolarisation des filles ;
  • L’achèvement scolaire ;
  • L’alphabétisation ;
  • La qualité des apprentissages.

Ce dernier point, priorité de l’ODD4, mobilise de plus en plus la coopération internationale (partie 2).

Dans la partie 3, l’entretien met en lumière la contribution de la coopération internationale aux progrès en éducation au niveau mondial. Les Objectifs pour le développement durable prévoient une action renforcée de la coopération dans la lutte contre la pauvreté qui passe notamment par un soutien à l’éducation. Tout en notant que les États restent les principaux bailleurs du secteur, l’aide internationale reste nécessaire pour les pays à faible revenu, même si elle ne les cible pas en priorité (par exemple, l’aide à l’éducation de base dans ces contextes est passée de 36% en 2002 à 22% en 2016). Parmi les grands initiatives visant à mobiliser des fonds internationaux à destination de l’éducation pour renverser cette tendance, Nicole Bella traite du Partenariat mondial pour l’éducation (PME), de l’Éducation ne peut attendre (Education cannot wait) et la Commission pour l’éducation. Comme le rapport porte particulièrement sur les enjeux liés aux migrations, est notamment évoqué l’appui de la coopération internationale en faveur des réfugiés et de systèmes éducatifs plus inclusifs.

Enfin, dans la partie 4, l’entretien aborde les actions possibles pour la coopération internationale en éducation face à l’enjeu spécifique des migrations (sachant qu’il existe une plus grande concentration des flux de migrants à l’intérieur des pays à faible revenu malgré ce que laisse supposer la grande médiatisation de cette question dans les pays du Nord). Parmi les recommandations faites dans le rapport, Nicole Bella souligne les axes suivants :

  • Respecter le droit à l’éducation ;
  • Développer des systèmes éducatifs inclusifs ;
  • Favoriser la diversité du corps enseignant ;
  • Renforcer l’aide humanitaire pour l’éducation.
Catégories
blog

#02 Why are international cooperation organizations so interested in education?

These few slogans promoted by international cooperation organizations emphasize the change that education can bring to individuals and/or societies. This article focuses on the vision of « change » that is adopted by cooperation actors.

The discourse in the recent Incheon Declaration, initiated by major international organizations and focusing on international educational goals by 2030, also indicates this idea of education for change: « Our vision is to transform lives through education, recognizing the important role of education as a main driver of development and in achieving the other proposed SDGs ». The idea of change is associated with the notion of « development »1. However, behind this notion lie many visions. We propose below to present the most common visions of development2.

The first one, the liberal capitalist paradigm, stresses the need to emphasize economic growth in the context of globalization. The strategy is to modernize institutions and economic activities, to change attitudes, and to improve workers’ competences and productivity. This paradigm is located within a very economic-centred vision. Next comes the marxist paradigm, often contrasted with the previous paradigm, which promotes the idea of granting liberty to peoples and individuals in a context of economic exploitation. Particularly for developing countries, the strategy is to break the ties of dependence on the former—sometimes even modern—colonial powers. A third paradigm is postcolonialism, which is mentioned less frequently. The idea is to achieve a different structure of society as perceived by others by dismantling the dominant conceptions of development. It is aimed particularly at former colonial countries. A fourth paradigm, liberal egalitarianism, corresponds to the official vision of the institutions of the United Nations system. Its key concepts are human rights, equality, fundamental freedoms or well-being. The strategy is to establish constitutional guarantees and international obligations in order that these principles are respected. Finally, the last paradigm is radical humanism, which has for vision the transformation of consciousness for the emancipation of the people and the creation of a just society. To achieve this objective, the strategy is to empower individuals and societies, particularly through education or various political initiatives.

It should be made clear that the paradigms we have just presented are, by definition, fixed models lacking flexibility. Indeed, some of these paradigms may overlap: we are thinking particularly of the Marxist and post-colonial models. Furthermore, the features of different paradigms may be identifiable in the development policies in a particular context. Finally, the first paradigm presented—liberal capitalism—is often considered as the dominant development model at the international level. For Morin (2011), « growth is perceived as the most obvious and dependable motor of development, and development as the most obvious and dependable motor of growth. The two terms are at the same time a means and an end of each other »3.

If we simply take three influential organizations in the field of education at the international level, namely the OECD, UNESCO and the World Bank they have shared (to varying degrees) this vision of development for at least three decades, which has implications for education4.

All citizens through learning become more effective participants in democratic, civil and economic processes (OECD, 1997); It is through education that the broadest possible introduction can be provided to the values, skills and knowledge which form the basis of respect for human rights and democratic principles, the rejection of violence and a spirit of tolerance (UNESCO, 1996); Development of specific content in curricula and educational materials to promote acceptance and integration of minorities, and use of minority languages in instruction (World Bank, 2005)

Education to improve economic growth (which should help to lift people out of poverty)

The increasing emphasis on the role in economic growth of people’s knowledge and skills, or ‘human capital’, has helped make education and training more central to the concerns of governments (OECD, 1997); UNESCO plans to study the issues arising from the transition to a knowledge society and to examine its effects on the organization, forms and content of knowledge […]. ICTs represent a strong lever for economic growth (UNESCO, 2002); Only by raising the capacities of its human capital can a country hope to increase productivity and attract the private investment needed to sustain growth in the medium term (World Bank, 2005)

Education as preparation for the job market

How much do various forms of education contribute to people’s employment prospects, to the literacy skills they need in everyday life, or to their prospective earnings? (OECD, 1997); Knowledge-based societies […] where knowledge and information increasingly determine new patterns of growth and wealth creation (UNESCO, 2002); Education must be designed to meet economies’ increasing demands for adaptable workers who can readily acquire new skills rather than for workers with a fixed set of technical skills that are used throughout their working lives (World Bank, 1995)

Education to improve economic growth (which should help to lift people out of poverty)

All citizens through learning become more effective participants in democratic, civil and economic processes (OECD, 1997); It is through education that the broadest possible introduction can be provided to the values, skills and knowledge which form the basis of respect for human rights and democratic principles, the rejection of violence and a spirit of tolerance (UNESCO, 1996); Development of specific content in curricula and educational materials to promote acceptance and integration of minorities, and use of minority languages in instruction (World Bank, 2005)

Even for UNESCO, which is often described as defending a humanistic vision, its positioning actually falters between progressive and economically-centred conceptions of development, blurring its expectations for education.

In the context of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) actively involving the three organizations, there is a tendency to broaden the vision of development by taking additional social or environmental aspects into account. However, the economy is key, even when it would seem that social aspects have been taken into consideration. The importance of education for economic growth and for acquiring the skills needed for the labor market has not disappeared. To give an example that concerns a large number of international cooperation institutions (see video below), 𝙜𝙞𝙧𝙡𝙨’ education is too often utilitarian (= gender inequalities will improve on their own as women become economic partners in development). A little limited, no? It is very rare to see in the discourse of cooperation agencies the desire to tackle in depth the roots of gender disparities.

Thus, many contradictions need to be highlighted in the discourse of international organizations: for instance, they wish to reverse the ecological model while promoting economic models that are destructive for the planet and societies (as recognised by UNESCO in its recent Rethinking Education report5). It is therefore crucial to step back from the ambitions of international cooperation: what world do we want through education? Should it not explicitly promote a humanistic education whose aim is the well-being of individuals and societies rather than a predominantly instrumental education whose main aim is economic production and consumerism?

IN ANY CASE, WE MUST BE WARY OF SLOGANS AND LOOK IN DETAIL AT THE PRECISE ORIENTATIONS OF INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN EDUCATION. WE WILL ADDRESS THIS TASK IN FUTURE ARTICLES.

whyeducation-3.jpg
Global Partnership for Education

References

1 UNESCO, Republic of Korea, UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, UN Women et al. (2015). Education 2030: Incheon Declaration and Framework for Action for the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 4

2 McCowan, T. (2015). Theories of Development

3 Morin, E. (2011). La Voie. Pour l’avenir de l’humanité

4 Lauwerier, T. (2018). What education for what development? Towards a broader and consensual vision by the OECD, UNESCO and the World Bank in the context of SDGs?

5 UNESCO. (2015). Rethinking education: towards a global common good?

Catégories
blog

#02 Pourquoi la coopération internationale s’intéresse tant à l’éducation ?

Ces quelques slogans brandis par les organisations de coopération internationale insistent sur le changement que peut apporter l’éducation aux individus et/ou aux sociétés. Cet article s’intéresse à la vision du « changement » qui est adoptée par les acteurs de la coopération.

Le discours présent dans la récente Déclaration d’Incheon, initiée par de grandes organisations internationales et portant sur les objectifs internationaux en matière d’éducation d’ici 2030, est également révélateur de cette idée d’éducation au service du changement : « Reconnaissant le rôle important de l’éducation en tant que vecteur principal du développement et de la réalisation des autres Objectifs de développement durable (ODD) proposés, notre vision est de transformer la vie grâce à l’éducation »1. L’idée de changement est associée à la notion de « développement ». Et derrière cette notion se cachent de nombreuses visions. Nous proposons ci-dessous de présenter les visions les plus répandues du « développement »2.

Capitaliste-libérale Favoriser la croissance économique dans un contexte de globalisation (moderniser les institutions et les activités économiques ; changer les attitudes, améliorer les compétences et la productivité des travailleurs)
Marxiste Rendre aux peuples et aux individus la liberté par rapport à l’exploitation économique (se dé-lier des relations de dépendance avec les anciens colonisateurs, voire les nouvelles puissances coloniales)
Égalitaire-libérale Favoriser les droits humains, l’égalité, les libertés fondamentales ou le bien-être, en ayant des garanties constitutionnelles et des obligations internationales pour faire respecter ces principes
Humaniste-radicale Viser la transformation des consciences par l’émancipation des peuples et la création de sociétés plus justes
Différentes visions du développement

Nous venons de présenter des visions qui correspondent à des modèles figés. En réalité, certaines de ces visions peuvent se chevaucher dans les politiques de développement d’un contexte donné. Mais ce qu’il faut retenir, c’est que la première vision présentée, capitaliste-libérale, est souvent considérée par de nombreuses recherches comme le modèle de développement dominant au niveau international. Pour Morin (2011), « la croissance est conçue comme le moteur évident et infaillible du développement, et le développement comme le moteur évident et infaillible de la croissance. Les deux termes sont à la fois fin et moyen l’un de l’autre »3.

Et effectivement, si l’on prend simplement trois organisations influentes dans le domaine de l’éducation au niveau international, à savoir la Banque mondiale, l’OCDE et l’UNESCO, elles partagent (à des degrés divers) cette vision du développement depuis au moins trois décennies, ce qui a des implications pour l’éducation4.

L’éducation pour améliorer la croissance économique (ce qui devrait aider à sortir de la pauvreté)

Les investissements dans une éducation de qualité conduisent à une croissance et à un développement économiques plus rapides et durables (Banque mondiale, 2011) ; L’accent croissant mis sur le rôle des connaissances et des compétences de la population dans la croissance économique a contribué à placer l’éducation et la formation au centre des préoccupations des gouvernements (OCDE, 1997) ; L’économie du savoir prend une importance grandissante, et cela a des répercussions majeures sur le rôle déterminant de l’éducation dans la croissance économique. (UNESCO, 2014)

L’éducation pour s’adapter au monde du travail

L’éducation doit être conçue pour répondre à la demande croissante des économies en travailleurs adaptables, capables d’acquérir facilement de nouvelles compétences (Banque mondiale, 1995) ; Il faut se demander dans quelle mesure les différentes formes d’éducation contribuent aux perspectives d’emploi (OCDE, 1997) ; Les systèmes éducatifs de nombreux pays ne sont pas encore adaptés à l’évolution rapide des opportunités du marché de l’emploi. Des efforts constants sont nécessaires pour faire en sorte que les apprenants maîtrisent mieux les compétences dont ils ont besoin pour être formés et capables de s’adapter aux opportunités nouvelles (UNESCO, 2014)

Et l’éducation pour tout le reste (cohésion sociale, citoyenneté active etc.)

Favoriser le développement de contenus spécifiques dans les programmes éducatifs pour promouvoir l’acceptation et l’intégration des minorités et l’utilisation des langues minoritaires dans l’enseignement (Banque mondiale, 2005) ; L’apprentissage permet à tous les citoyens de participer plus efficacement aux processus démocratiques, civils et économiques (OCDE, 1997) ; Education pour les droits de l’homme et la démocratie, la paix et des valeurs universellement partagées telles que la citoyenneté, la tolérance, la non-violence et le dialogue entre les cultures et les civilisations (UNESCO, 2002)

Même pour l’UNESCO, dont on lit souvent qu’elle défend une vision humaniste, son positionnement vacille en réalité entre conceptions progressistes et économico-centrées du développement, ce qui rend flou ses attentes quant à l’éducation.

Dans le contexte des Objectifs de développement durable (ODD), impliquant activement les trois organisations, il y a une tendance à élargir la vision du développement en prenant en considération davantage d’aspects sociaux ou environnementaux. Toutefois, l’économie reste toujours la raison d’être de l’investissement dans l’éducation. L’importance que revêt l’éducation pour la croissance économique et pour acquérir les compétences nécessaires au marché du travail n’a pas disparu. Pour donner un exemple qui concerne un grand nombre d’institutions de coopération internationale (cf. vidéo ci-dessous), l’éducation des 𝙛𝙞𝙡𝙡𝙚𝙨 est trop souvent envisagée sous un angle utilitariste (= les rapports sociaux de sexe s’amélioreront d’eux-mêmes à mesure que les femmes deviendront des partenaires économiques dans le développement). Un peu limité, non ? Il est très rare de voir dans le discours des agences de coopération la volonté de s’attaquer en profondeur aux racines des disparités de genre.

Ainsi, de multiples contradictions sont à souligner dans le discours de nombreuses organisations internationales : elles souhaitent par exemple un renversement du modèle écologique tout en valorisant des modèles économiques destructeurs pour la planète et les sociétés (comme le reconnaît d’ailleurs l’UNESCO dans son récent rapport Repenser l’éducation5). Il est donc crucial de prendre du recul sur les ambitions de la coopération internationale : quel monde voulons-nous grâce à l’éducation ? Ne doit-elle pas explicitement promouvoir une éducation humaniste dont le but est le bien-être des individus et des sociétés au lieu d’une éducation majoritairement instrumentale qui a pour visée principalement la production économique et le consumérisme.

QUOIQU’IL EN SOIT, IL FAUT SE MÉFIER DES SLOGANS ET REGARDER EN DÉTAIL LES ORIENTATIONS PRÉCISES PORTÉES PAR LES ACTEURS DE LA COOPÉRATION INTERNATIONALE EN ÉDUCATION. C’EST À CETTE TÂCHE QUE NOUS NOUS ATTELLERONS DANS DE PROCHAINS ARTICLES.

whyeducation-3.jpg
Partenariat Mondial pour l’Éducation

Références

1 UNESCO, Republic of Korea, UNDP, UNFPA, UNICEF, UN Women et al. (2015). Déclaration d’Incheon. Education 2030: Vers une éducation inclusive et équitable de qualité et un apprentissage tout au long de la vie pour tous

2 McCowan, T. (2015). Theories of Development

3 Morin, E. (2011). La Voie. Pour l’avenir de l’humanité

4 Lauwerier, T. (2018). What education for what development? Towards a broader and consensual vision by the OECD, UNESCO and the World Bank in the context of SDGs?

5 UNESCO. (2015). Repenser l’éducation. Vers un bien commun mondial?